Brow Lift – Coronal – Description and Recovery

Board-Certified Plastic & Reconstructive Surgeons Serving Pensacola, FL & Mobile, AL

Posted: September 9, 2020
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Fast Facts:

  • A coronal brow lift or forehead lift gives your face a refreshed appearance by repositioning the tissues of the forehead.
  • The procedure corrects sagging forehead skin, lifts heavy, sagging eyebrows, and smooths the forehead to give the upper part of the face a more youthful appearance.
  • A coronal brow lift is best suited for women and men with thick hair. It is not recommended for men with male-pattern baldness or a receding hairline.

What is a coronal brow lift?

A coronal brow lift involves elevating the eyebrows through an incision along the top of the head, behind the hairline. How that’s done is basically an incision is made from ear-to-ear on the top of the head. The tissues are lifted up, going down to the eyebrows. The tissues are then pulled tight and stretched backwards to elevate the eyebrows and tighten up the forehead.

That is a coronal brow lift. It involves an incision ear-to-ear on the top of the head, and the skin and scalp are pulled up along with the eyebrows, lengthening the forehead, and moving the hairline back a little bit, with the final scar concealed on the top of your head.

There are other techniques of brow lifts that I’ll describe in other blogs. 

Coronal Brow Lift – Pros and Cons

The advantage of this technique is that the scar is on the top of the head. If you have hair there, the scar is hidden in your hair. The other advantage is that you’re less likely to have any numbness along your forehead or upper hairline because the incision is so far back. Another advantage is you don’t need any hardware or plates and screws or any fixation devices anchored into your skull because the tissue is suspended up in place by removing the extra skin. The skin removal is what allows it to be held in place and maintain its position.

The number one downside of a coronal brow lift operation is that your forehead gets longer and your hairline moves back by about half an inch. So, if I have a receding hairline in the front of my head, I would not want a coronal brow lift because it’s going to pull my hairline even further back as it lifts my eyebrows. And if I continue to lose hair and go bald, I’ll have a visible scar that goes ear-to-ear on the top of my head. Now, a lot of guys don’t care because they’re tall. If you’re a taller person, there’s fewer people that see the top of your head. But that’s something to keep in mind.

Recovery from a Coronal Brow Lift

Incision care: What I need you to do following a coronal brow lift is keep the incision on the top of your head moist with bacitracin or Aquaphor, but nothing with Neosporin. All you need to do is keep that incision nice and moist. There’s really nothing else you need to do. There’s not a whole lot of additional maintenance or care following a coronal brow lift.

Drain: I will put a drain underneath your forehead skin to evacuate that fluid. You can check out my blog on how to manage a drain. We will take that drain out in a matter of days, usually in 1-3 days.

Sutures and staples: On the top of your head, the incision is closed with deep sutures that will dissolve, as well as staples. The reason staples are used there is that staples cause less alopecia (hair loss) and are nicer to your hair follicles than sutures. For the very deep layers where it’s not going to affect your hair follicles, we use dissolving sutures. The top layer where the sutures would affect your hair follicles, we use staples. Those staples will come out after about 10 days.

 

More About Us

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